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Welcome to the Field of Crosses' 11 DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE

The mission and the commitment of the Field of Crosses Memorial organization is to assure that present and future generations always remember and never forget the thousands of men and women from Southern Alberta and across Canada who gave their tomorrows for our today.

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6 days ago
Field of Crosses

#NationalSiblingsDay serves to celebrate and recognize the importance of brothers and sisters.

Today, we would like to acknowledge the 57 sets of sibling combinations we commemorate each November in the Field of Crosses, including brothers Joseph and Thomas Dutton.

DUTTON, Joseph M.
Age 23 – FS (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 06/06/1942

DUTTON, Thomas A.
Age 20 – WO2 (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 03/03/1943

Joseph Mervyn Dutton, born on April 3, 1919, and brother of Thomas Alexander Dutton, born in Calgary, Alberta on June 3, 1922, were the sons of Mabel Dutton and Mervyn “Red” Dutton, who at the time was the acting President of the of the National Hockey League.

Joseph attended school in Calgary, Alberta at Cliff Bungalow and later Central High School. At the time of his enlistment, his occupation was listed as a hockey player with an Eastern US amateur team.

At Enlisting in Calgary on October 11, 1940 with the Royal Canadian Air Force, service number R60552, serving with the 419 (Moose) Squadron.

Joseph earned his Pilots Wings July 15, 1941.

Joseph was killed in action on June 6, 1942 at the age of 23 when his aircraft failed to return from air operations against Essen, Germany. This was his 30th mission, he received his Operational Wings posthumously on May 2, 1946.

Thomas was attending St. John’s College in Winnipeg, Manitoba when he decided to enlist in Regina, Saskatchewan on April 2, 1940, with the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Service number R61271, serving with the 427 (Lion) Squadron. Thomas achieved the rank of Warrant Officer Class II.

He was killed in action on March 3, 1943 at the age of 20 when his aircraft had been detailed on a mine laying operation over enemy water. Thomas and his crew did not return from the operation.

Warrant Officer Class II Thomas A. Dutton and Flight Sergeant Joseph M. Dutton have no known graves, however their names are inscribed on the Runnymede Memorial, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey, England. They are also commemorated on the Nanton War Memorial.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/
... See MoreSee Less

#NationalSiblingsDay serves to celebrate and recognize the importance of brothers and sisters. 

Today, we would like to acknowledge the 57 sets of sibling combinations we commemorate each November in the Field of Crosses, including brothers Joseph and Thomas Dutton.

DUTTON, Joseph M.
Age 23 – FS (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 06/06/1942

DUTTON, Thomas A.
Age 20 – WO2 (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 03/03/1943

Joseph Mervyn Dutton, born on April 3, 1919, and brother of Thomas Alexander Dutton, born in Calgary, Alberta on June 3, 1922, were the sons of Mabel Dutton and Mervyn “Red” Dutton, who at the time was the acting President of the of the National Hockey League.

Joseph attended school in Calgary, Alberta at Cliff Bungalow and later Central High School. At the time of his enlistment, his occupation was listed as a hockey player with an Eastern US amateur team.

At Enlisting in Calgary on October 11, 1940 with the Royal Canadian Air Force, service number R60552, serving with the 419 (Moose) Squadron. 

Joseph earned his Pilots Wings July 15, 1941.

Joseph was killed in action on June 6, 1942 at the age of 23 when his aircraft failed to return from air operations against Essen, Germany. This was his 30th mission, he received his Operational Wings posthumously on May 2, 1946.

Thomas was attending St. John’s College in Winnipeg, Manitoba when he decided to enlist in Regina, Saskatchewan on April 2, 1940, with the Royal Canadian Air Force. 

Service number R61271, serving with the 427 (Lion) Squadron. Thomas achieved the rank of Warrant Officer Class II.

He was killed in action on March 3, 1943 at the age of 20 when his aircraft had been detailed on a mine laying operation over enemy water. Thomas and his crew did not return from the operation.

Warrant Officer Class II Thomas A. Dutton and Flight Sergeant Joseph M. Dutton have no known graves, however their names are inscribed on the Runnymede Memorial, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey, England. They are also commemorated on the Nanton War Memorial.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
1 week ago
Field of Crosses

Vimy Ridge Day is a day to commemorate the deaths and casualties of members of the Canadian Corps in the Battle of Vimy Ridge, which took place during the First World War. The holiday has been observed annually on 9 April since 2003.

On the morning of April 9th, 1917, after days of heavy artillery bombardments across Northern France, Canadian troops advanced on Vimy Ridge. In their first opportunity to fight together, all four Canadian divisions stormed the front. At 5:30 AM, 15,000 troops advanced under the protection of the creeping barrage, a newly adopted strategy that used artillery as a defensive cover.

Vimy Ridge was a strategically important position that saw approximately 150,000 deaths of French and British troops in the earlier stages of the war. To prevent a repeat of earlier efforts, the Canadian corps thoroughly planned and practiced their attack. The infantry were given specialist roles such as machine gunners, rifleman, and grenade throwers to allow for greater firepower and flexibility in the heat of battle. Models of the battlefield and aerial reconnaissance photographs were provided behind the lines for training purposes.

Along with superior preparation, the Canadian forces outnumbered the German defenders, 35,000 to 10,000. By April 12th, the Canadians captured the Pimple, a high point on the north end of the ridge, which was one of the most well defended parts of the German lines. Although the battle was successful, April 9th, 1917 became and still remains to this day, the bloodiest day in Canadian military history. In total, 3,598 were killed and an additional 7,000 wounded. In recognition of Canada’s success, 100 hectares of land was given to the Canadian government, including Hill 145 in France, which is now the home of the Vimy Memorial; the white marble monument was unveiled in 1936, and is an important reminder of the sacrifices Canadians made.

Each November the Field of Crosses in Calgary commemorates 209 Canadians from Southern Alberta who made the ultimate sacrifice at Vimy Ridge.

www.fieldofcrosses.com
... See MoreSee Less

Vimy Ridge Day is a day to commemorate the deaths and casualties of members of the Canadian Corps in the Battle of Vimy Ridge, which took place during the First World War. The holiday has been observed annually on 9 April since 2003.

On the morning of April 9th, 1917, after days of heavy artillery bombardments across Northern France, Canadian troops advanced on Vimy Ridge. In their first opportunity to fight together, all four Canadian divisions stormed the front. At 5:30 AM, 15,000 troops advanced under the protection of the creeping barrage, a newly adopted strategy that used artillery as a defensive cover.  

Vimy Ridge was a strategically important position that saw approximately 150,000 deaths of French and British troops in the earlier stages of the war. To prevent a repeat of earlier efforts, the Canadian corps thoroughly planned and practiced their attack. The infantry were given specialist roles such as machine gunners, rifleman, and grenade throwers to allow for greater firepower and flexibility in the heat of battle. Models of the battlefield and aerial reconnaissance photographs were provided behind the lines for training purposes.  

Along with superior preparation, the Canadian forces outnumbered the German defenders, 35,000 to 10,000. By April 12th, the Canadians captured the Pimple, a high point on the north end of the ridge, which was one of the most well defended parts of the German lines. Although the battle was successful, April 9th, 1917 became and still remains to this day, the bloodiest day in Canadian military history. In total, 3,598 were killed and an additional 7,000 wounded. In recognition of Canada’s success, 100 hectares of land was given to the Canadian government, including Hill 145 in France, which is now the home of the Vimy Memorial; the white marble monument was unveiled in 1936, and is an important reminder of the sacrifices Canadians made.  

Each November the Field of Crosses in Calgary commemorates 209 Canadians from Southern Alberta who made the ultimate sacrifice at Vimy Ridge.

www.fieldofcrosses.com

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Lest We Forget

2 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

𝘞𝘢𝘳𝘮𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘢 𝘫𝘰𝘺𝘧𝘶𝘭 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘣𝘭𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘥 𝘌𝘢𝘴𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘵 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘊𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴. ... See MoreSee Less

𝘞𝘢𝘳𝘮𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘢 𝘫𝘰𝘺𝘧𝘶𝘭 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘣𝘭𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘥 𝘌𝘢𝘴𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘵 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘊𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴.
3 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

During the night of March 24-25, 1944 one of the most amazing and daring escapes in history took place at the Stalag Luft III German prison camp.

Organization X, as they were called, set out to dig three tunnels (named Tom, Dick, and Harry) simultaneously in hopes that one of them would lead the men to freedom.

What is now known as “the Great Escape” was led by Canadian tunnel diggers, Canadian document forgers, Canadian scroungers, and many others in a variety of roles, with some 76 prisoners eventually making a break-out on that cold March night.

One of these Canadians, Flight Lieutenant Henry Birkland, of Calgary, Alberta is commemorated each November in the Field of Crosses.

Flight Lieutenant Birkland, was honoured on September 7, 2002 with a lake being named after him and was one of six Canadian airmen shot after being recaptured during the escape from Stalag Luft III.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/
... See MoreSee Less

During the night of March 24-25, 1944 one of the most amazing and daring escapes in history took place at the Stalag Luft III German prison camp.

Organization X, as they were called, set out to dig three tunnels (named Tom, Dick, and Harry) simultaneously in hopes that one of them would lead the men to freedom.

What is now known as “the Great Escape” was led by Canadian tunnel diggers, Canadian document forgers, Canadian scroungers, and many others in a variety of roles, with some 76 prisoners eventually making a break-out on that cold March night.

One of these Canadians, Flight Lieutenant Henry Birkland, of Calgary, Alberta is commemorated each November in the Field of Crosses. 

Flight Lieutenant Birkland, was honoured on September 7, 2002 with a lake being named after him and was one of six Canadian airmen shot after being recaptured during the escape from Stalag Luft III.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
4 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

Happy St. Patrick's Day! 🍀 ... See MoreSee Less

Happy St. Patricks Day! 🍀

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💚☘️💚☘️💚

Thanks Murray, ‘Fair winds and following seas’

LOVE IT!!!! TIS HIMSELF!☘️☘️☘️

Thanks Murray McCann Happy St. Patrick's Day

Carol McCann

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#NationalSiblingsDay serves to celebrate and recognize the importance of brothers and sisters.

Today, we would like to acknowledge the 57 sets of sibling combinations we commemorate each November in the Field of Crosses, including brothers Joseph and Thomas Dutton.

DUTTON, Joseph M.
Age 23 – FS (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 06/06/1942

DUTTON, Thomas A.
Age 20 – WO2 (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 03/03/1943

Joseph Mervyn Dutton, born on April 3, 1919, and brother of Thomas Alexander Dutton, born in Calgary, Alberta on June 3, 1922, were the sons of Mabel Dutton and Mervyn “Red” Dutton, who at the time was the acting President of the of the National Hockey League.

Joseph attended school in Calgary, Alberta at Cliff Bungalow and later Central High School. At the time of his enlistment, his occupation was listed as a hockey player with an Eastern US amateur team.

At Enlisting in Calgary on October 11, 1940 with the Royal Canadian Air Force, service number R60552, serving with the 419 (Moose) Squadron.

Joseph earned his Pilots Wings July 15, 1941.

Joseph was killed in action on June 6, 1942 at the age of 23 when his aircraft failed to return from air operations against Essen, Germany. This was his 30th mission, he received his Operational Wings posthumously on May 2, 1946.

Thomas was attending St. John’s College in Winnipeg, Manitoba when he decided to enlist in Regina, Saskatchewan on April 2, 1940, with the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Service number R61271, serving with the 427 (Lion) Squadron. Thomas achieved the rank of Warrant Officer Class II.

He was killed in action on March 3, 1943 at the age of 20 when his aircraft had been detailed on a mine laying operation over enemy water. Thomas and his crew did not return from the operation.

Warrant Officer Class II Thomas A. Dutton and Flight Sergeant Joseph M. Dutton have no known graves, however their names are inscribed on the Runnymede Memorial, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey, England. They are also commemorated on the Nanton War Memorial.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

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Vimy Ridge Day is a day to commemorate the deaths and casualties of members of the Canadian Corps in the Battle of Vimy Ridge, which took place during the First World War. The holiday has been observed annually on 9 April since 2003.

On the morning of April 9th, 1917, after days of heavy artillery bombardments across Northern France, Canadian troops advanced on Vimy Ridge. In their first opportunity to fight together, all four Canadian divisions stormed the front. At 5:30 AM, 15,000 troops advanced under the protection of the creeping barrage, a newly adopted strategy that used artillery as a defensive cover.

Vimy Ridge was a strategically important position that saw approximately 150,000 deaths of French and British troops in the earlier stages of the war. To prevent a repeat of earlier efforts, the Canadian corps thoroughly planned and practiced their attack. The infantry were given specialist roles such as machine gunners, rifleman, and grenade throwers to allow for greater firepower and flexibility in the heat of battle. Models of the battlefield and aerial reconnaissance photographs were provided behind the lines for training purposes.

Along with superior preparation, the Canadian forces outnumbered the German defenders, 35,000 to 10,000. By April 12th, the Canadians captured the Pimple, a high point on the north end of the ridge, which was one of the most well defended parts of the German lines. Although the battle was successful, April 9th, 1917 became and still remains to this day, the bloodiest day in Canadian military history. In total, 3,598 were killed and an additional 7,000 wounded. In recognition of Canada’s success, 100 hectares of land was given to the Canadian government, including Hill 145 in France, which is now the home of the Vimy Memorial; the white marble monument was unveiled in 1936, and is an important reminder of the sacrifices Canadians made.

Each November the Field of Crosses in Calgary commemorates 209 Canadians from Southern Alberta who made the ultimate sacrifice at Vimy Ridge.

www.fieldofcrosses.com
...

28 2

𝘞𝘢𝘳𝘮𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘢 𝘫𝘰𝘺𝘧𝘶𝘭 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘣𝘭𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘥 𝘌𝘢𝘴𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘵 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘊𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴. ...

27 2

During the night of March 24-25, 1944 one of the most amazing and daring escapes in history took place at the Stalag Luft III German prison camp.

Organization X, as they were called, set out to dig three tunnels (named Tom, Dick, and Harry) simultaneously in hopes that one of them would lead the men to freedom.

What is now known as “the Great Escape” was led by Canadian tunnel diggers, Canadian document forgers, Canadian scroungers, and many others in a variety of roles, with some 76 prisoners eventually making a break-out on that cold March night.

One of these Canadians, Flight Lieutenant Henry Birkland, of Calgary, Alberta is commemorated each November in the Field of Crosses.

Flight Lieutenant Birkland, was honoured on September 7, 2002 with a lake being named after him and was one of six Canadian airmen shot after being recaptured during the escape from Stalag Luft III.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

22 1

Happy St. Patrick's Day! 🍀 ...

28 1

𝐓𝐫𝐞𝐛𝐛𝐥𝐞, 𝐏𝐡𝐲𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐬 𝐌.
Age 19 – Pte CWAC
Date of Death: 21/12/44

Phyllis Margaret Trebble was born September 4, 1925 in Medicine Hat, Alberta. She was the daughter of Tom and Thurza Trebble of Winnifred, Alberta.

Phyllis enlisted November 3, 1943 in Calgary, Alberta joining the Canadian Women’s Army Corp, service number W130290. She died December 21, 1944 at the age of 19 and is buried in Medicine Hat Hillside Cemetery.

Sadly, no further information has been found.

Private Phyllis M. Trebble is remembered each November in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

13 2

𝐁𝐮𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐧, 𝐄𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐞 𝐁.
Age 20 – L/Cpl CWAC
Date of Death: 20/09/43

Emilie Buchanan was born on March 4, 1923 in Carmangay, Alberta. She was the daughter of Linda Nugent and the late Ernest Nugent. Emilie was married to Pte. James F Buchanan of Rainier, Alberta, serving in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp. (RCAMC) stationed in Calgary.

Emilie enlisted September 30, 1942 in the Canadian Women’s Army Corp (CWAC), service number W13584 and reached the rank of Lance Corporal. While stationed at Canadian Forces Base Suffield, Alberta she was killed in a car accident on September 20, 1943 at the age of 20.

Lance Corporal Emilie Buchanan is buried at the Carmangay Cemetery and is commemorated each November in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

23 2

Today, March 8, is International Women's Day. A day to celebrate the contributions of women and girls everywhere and to recognize women who inspire us all.

This week, we would like to take the opportunity to share with you a few stories of some of the brave Southern Alberta women who have served our country.

𝐁𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐧𝐥𝐞𝐞, 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌.
Age 23 – LAW RCAF
Date of Death: 10/10/43

Edith Mary Brownlee was born September 23, 1920 in Rycroft, Alberta. She was the daughter of George Howard and Mary Renton Brownlee (nee Aitchison). The family moved to homestead in Bridgeview, Alberta in 1929.

Edith enlisted October 31, 1942 in the Royal Canadian Air Force (Women’s Division), service number W309326 and obtained the rank of Leading Aircraftwoman. Sadly, she was killed by a hit and run driver in Brantford, Ontario on October 10, 1943 at the age of 23. The driver was convicted and sent to jail.

Edith is buried at Spirit River Municipal Cemetery, Alberta and is honoured in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

16 1

𝗞𝗻𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁𝘀, 𝗙𝗿𝗲𝗱𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗸 𝗔.
Age 21 – Sergeant 10th Bn
Date of Death: 27/02/1915

Frederick Anthony Knights was born in Hermon Hill, Wanstead, Essex England on July 2, 1893. As a boy he emigrated with his family to Canada. Frederick was the son of Richard and Annie Mary Knights of Massingham Ranch known for sheep breeding in Millerville, Alberta.

Frederick’s occupation was listed as a photographer and he had previously served 3 years with the 103rd Calgary Rifles. At the outbreak of WWI, Frederick enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) on September 24, 1914 and served with the 10th Battalion. Service number 20727.

Frederick was killed in action on February 27, 1915 at the age of 21 and is buried in Berks Cemetery Extension in Belgium.

Frederick’s older brother, Charles Richard Knights enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force on April 14, 1916 as a member of the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. He was killed in action October 26, 1917.

Both Frederick and his brother Charles are commemorated in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

14 1

𝗔𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻, 𝗝𝗼𝗵𝗻
Age 24 – ST RCNVR
Date of Death: 10/02/1942

John Anderson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Anderson of Eckville, Alberta.

John worked in Calgary employed by Picardy’s. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve (RCNVR), service number V13860, as a Steward on HMCS Spikenard.

John was killed on the 10th of February, 1942 at the age of 24. Steward John Anderson is commemorated on the Halifax Memorial in Nova Scotia, Canada.

HMCS Spikenard was torpedoed and sunk by German U-boat (U-136) south of Ireland while on convoy escort. There were only eight survivors.

John Anderson is commemorated in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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23 2

Little more than 20 years after the end of the “War to End all Wars,” the Second World War (1939–1945) erupted and soon spread across Europe and around the globe. The Second World War saw considerable growth in how Black Canadians served in the military. While some Black recruits would encounter resistance when trying to enlist in the army, in contrast to the First World War no segregated battalions were created. Indeed, several thousand Black men and women served during the bloodiest war the world has ever seen. Black Canadians joined regular units and served alongside their white fellow soldiers here at home, in England, and on the battlefields of Europe. Together they shared the same harsh experiences of war while fighting in places like Italy, France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

In the early years of the war, however, the Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Canadian Air Force were not as inclusive in their policies. This did not mean that trail-blazing Black Canadians did not find a way to persevere and serve. Some Black sailors served in the Navy, and Black airmen served in the Air Force as ground crew and aircrew here at home and overseas in Europe.

The contributions of Black servicemen was second to none and several earned decorations for their bravery. Some Black women joined the military as well, serving in support roles so that more men were available for the front lines.

And back on the home front, Black Canadians again made important contributions by working in factories that produced vehicles, weapons, ammunition and other materials for the war effort, and taking part in other patriotic efforts like war bond drives. For example, Black women in Nova Scotia worked in vital jobs in the shipbuilding industry, filling the shoes of the men who would usually do that work but who were away fighting in the war.

Many Black Veterans returned home after the war with a heightened awareness of the value of freedom and their right to be treated as equals after all they had done for Canada in their country’s time of need. The service of Black Canadians in the Second World War remains a point of pride.
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Every February, people in Canada are invited to participate in Black History Month to celebrate the legacy and contributions of Black Canadians and their communities. This is a time for all of us to learn and remember.

𝐖𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐬, 𝐒𝐚𝐦𝐮𝐞𝐥 𝐃.
35 – Pte 50th Bn
Date of Death: 22/08/17

Samuel Daniel Watts was born May 25, 1882 in Texas, USA. Samuel immigrated from Oklahoma to Canada and at the age of 34 enlisted in Olds, Alberta – joining the Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) and was assigned to the 50 th Battalion. He was also a member of the 187 Battalion Brass Band.

Samuel was only one of a few African-Canadians to have served during the First World War – yet despite the hardships they faced, he bravely served his country like all of the others who went off to war.

Samuel was killed on August 22, 1917, leaving behind his wife Margaret and three children. He was well known for being a cook, a western song writer and a brilliant inventor with several patents pending in Ottawa at the time.

Samuel Daniel Watts is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

He is commemorated in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
...

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𝗠𝘂𝗿𝗽𝗵𝘆, 𝗞𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗲𝘁𝗵 𝗥𝗼𝗯𝗲𝗿𝘁
21 – TR 12th MD
Date of Death - 17/07/44

Kenneth was born on June 9, 1923. He joined the army and held the rank of Trooper in the 12th MD (Manitoba Dragoons) of R.C.A.C. (Royal Canadian Army Corps – 18th Armored Car Regt.) in World War II. He died at age 21 on July 17, 1944 and is buried in Bretteville-Sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery in Calvados, France. His grave’s reference is XX.B.13.

𝗠𝘂𝗿𝗽𝗵𝘆, 𝗪𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗮𝗺 𝗚𝗼𝗿𝗺𝗮𝗻
20 – F/S RCAF
Date of Death - 09/01/43

William G. Murphy was born on May 12, 1922 in Ardenville, Alberta. He served in World War II as a Flight Sergeant in the 419 Sqdn., RCAF flying a Halifax bomber. He unfortunately died on January 9, 1943 at the age of 20 during a gardening mission. Gardening is when you drop mines from planes. He is commemorated at the Runnymede Memorial, Englefield Green near Egham, Surrey England with other air force members. His grave panel is 185.

We honour the sons of William J. and Marie K Murphy each November in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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Every year on January 27, we pay tribute to the memory of the victims of the Holocaust.

This date marks the anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau by Soviet troops on January 27, 1945.

In 2005, The United Nations General Assembly designated January 27, International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust or International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

#NeverAgain
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30 4

𝗠𝗰𝗞𝗻𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁, 𝗪𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗮𝗺 𝗟. 𝗗𝗙𝗖 –
Age 22 – F/O (P) RAF –
Date of Death 12/01/1941

Remembered each November in Calgary’s Field of Crosses.

William Lidstone ‘Willie’ McKnight was born 18 November 1918 in Edmonton and grew up in Calgary. He attended Crescent Heights High School and quarterbacked their football team.

Joining the Royal Air Force (RAF) in January 1939, service number 41937, William served in the 242 Squadron (an all Canadian RAF Squadron) under the command of Squadron Leader Douglas Bader. His combat experiences were during the final phase of the Battle of France, covering the retreat from Dunkirk and later the Battle of Britain and the Channel Front. Over Dunkirk, in four days, William shot down six enemy aircraft, eventually claiming ten victories by 7 June 1940. With Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain, William destroyed 16 ½ enemy aircraft resulting in a promotion to Flying Officer. He was one of the top-ranking fighter pilots of the RAF who was credited with a bag of 23 enemy aircraft kills and Canada’s fifth-highest scoring fighter ace of the Second World War.

William McKnight was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) on 30 August 1940 and a Bar in September 1940. He was greatly respected and was chosen by S/L Bader as his wingman.

F/O William McKnight was reported missing over the English Channel on 12 January 1941 following air operations. He has no known grave and is inscribed on the Runnymede Memorial in Surrey, United Kingdom.

McKnight Boulevard in Calgary was named after him in 1967.

"𝘞𝘦’𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘨𝘰𝘵 𝘧𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘰𝘳𝘪𝘨𝘪𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘵𝘸𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘺-𝘵𝘸𝘰 𝘱𝘪𝘭𝘰𝘵𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘲𝘶𝘢𝘥𝘳𝘰𝘯 𝘭𝘦𝘧𝘵 𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘴𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘶𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘭𝘦𝘧𝘵 𝘢𝘪𝘯’𝘵 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘵𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘢𝘮𝘦 𝘣𝘭𝘰𝘬𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦. 𝘐𝘵’𝘴 𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘭𝘪𝘢𝘳 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘸𝘢𝘳 𝘴𝘦𝘦𝘮𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘰𝘭𝘥𝘦𝘳 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘦𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘷𝘪𝘦𝘸𝘴 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘵 𝘪𝘯 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦."
– a quote from a letter Willie sent back home.

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3 𝘉𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘳𝘦𝘮𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘕𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘦𝘳 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘊𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴.

𝗔𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻 𝗝𝗮𝗺𝗲𝘀 𝗦. –
Age 22- F/S RCAF
Date of Death 17/10/42
𝗔𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻 𝗪𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗮𝗺 𝗕. –
Age 22 – F/O (P) RCAF
Date of Death 20/01/1943
𝗔𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻 𝗟𝗹𝗼𝘆𝗱 𝗚. –
Age 27 – F/S (AG) RCAF
Date of Death 31/03/1944

James, William, and Lloyd were born in Craigmyle, Alberta and were the only sons of William Boyd and Dagnie Anderson. Two of the boys, James and William were twins. Each of the boys enlisted in the RCAF.

Flight Sergeant James Sangster Anderson, who died when the pilot tried to land on three engines on October 17, 1942, was 22 years old.

Flying Officer William Boyd Anderson who failed to return from anti-sub patrol on January 20, 1943, was 22 years old.

Flight Sergeant Lloyd George Anderson who was killed on March 31, 1944 while on operations over Nuremberg, Germany, was 27 years old.

Their Mom always set a place at dinner hoping William would be coming home as his body was never recovered. William is commemorated at Runnymede Memorial (Panel 172) in Surry, United Kingdom. Mrs. Anderson was named the National Memorial Silver Cross Mother in 1959 and traveled by train to Ottawa for the November 11 services where she laid a wreath at the National War Memorial.

The family was honoured in the mid 1950’s when the Grade 1-8 school at the Penhold Air Base was named the ‘Andersons of Craigmyle School’.

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The Field of Crosses would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere gratitude for all of the support we received throughout 2020. It is with your support that we are able to continue honouring the fallen heroes of Southern Alberta each year, and share this experience with future generations.

Best wishes to all for a happy, healthy and safe 2021.

www.FieldOfCrosses.com
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BOSSERT, Max - 34 - L/Cpl CScotR - 31/12/1944

Max Bossert was born in Stirling, Alberta on November 4, 1910 to August and Anna Bossert. He married Ardella Nate of Magrath, Alberta and had three children. Max enlisted in Fort MacLeod in 1941 and went on to serve in the 1st Battalion, Canadian Scottish
Regiment, (Royal Canadian Infantry Corps). Max attained the rank of Lance Corporal. As part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, he took part in the Normandy invasion, landing on Juno Beach, June 6, 1944.

Max was wounded and taken prisoner on December 20 and died of his wounds on December 31. 1944 at the age of 34 in Bedburg, Germany. Max is commemorated at Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in the Nijmegen, Netherlands.

www.FieldofCrosses.com
Registered Charity No. 74426 0084 RR0001
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SCHROEDER, Ronald F. – 20 – Pte Hast & PER – 25/12/1943

Ronald Fred Schroeder was born March 20, 1923. Son of Fred and Martha Schroeder of Calgary, Alberta.

Ronald enlisted November 1, 1941 with the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment of the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps. (service number L/51409).

Private Ronald F. Schroeder died December 25, 1943 at the age of 20. He is buried in Moro River Canadian War Cemetery in Italy.

In December 1943, as part of the Allied advance through Italy, Canadian forces fought one of their toughest battles of the war in a bid to capture the town of Ortona. The month-long campaign — first at the Moro River outside Ortona, then with vicious street fighting in the town itself. Ortona was eventually won for the Allies.
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Taerum, Torger H. DFC – 23 – Flight Lieutenant (Navigator) RCAF -16/09/43

Torger Harlo Taerum was born in Milo, Alberta on May 22, 1920. He was better known as Terry to his friends. He joined the RCAF and was assigned to the 617 Squadron, later known as “the Dam Busters”. To have been hand-picked to be Wing Commanders Guy Gibson’s navigator, is likely the greatest compliment that could have been paid to a Bomber Command navigator. Their missions were to develop and carry out operations to destroy water reservoir dams supporting war production in the Ruhr Valley. Due to their successes Terry Taerum was presented with the Distinguished Flying Cross by the Queen at Buckingham Palace on June 22, 1943. Terry survived the Ruhr dam raids. Sadly, Terry was killed in action September 16, 1943.

A year later Terry’s 18 year old brother, Lorne C Taerum was killed on his sixth operation when his Lancaster was shot down over Holland.

Both Terry and Lorne are commemorated in the Field of Crosses.
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