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Welcome to the Field of Crosses' 11 DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE

The mission and the commitment of the Field of Crosses Memorial organization is to assure that present and future generations always remember and never forget the thousands of men and women from Southern Alberta and across Canada who gave their tomorrows for our today.

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2 days ago
Field of Crosses

Today for #InternationalNursesDay, we remember Nursing Sister Matilda Ethel Green who has a cross erected in her honor each November in the Field of Crosses.

Matilda Green was born August 14, 1886, in Litsowel, Ontario. She received her nursing training and graduated at Medicine Hat General Hospital in Alberta. In April, 1917, she enlisted with the Canadian Army Nursing Service from Calgary, AB. Immediately after, she was serving at the No. 7 Canadian General Hospital in Étaples, France. It is an understatement to say that the conditions Green would have faced were challenging. Supplies, food and water were often scarce, the amount of patients and wounded coming in were overwhelming, and nursing sisters often worked long shifts.

In the First World War, women did not fight as soldiers, but they greatly contributed to the war effort in many other ways. Nearly 2,500 other Canadian women served overseas as nursing sisters (just as Matilda Green did), and many more worked at home to care for the sick and wounded. Often referred to as "Angels of Mercy" by the many soldiers they treated, there is much to learn from the bravery displayed and sacrifices made by these women.

In October of 1918, Green fell ill with pneumonia, and succumbed to the illness, dying of it. She was one of 53 women to give their lives for Canada.

Matilda Green's sacrifice reminds us not to take our freedom for granted. Her life and legacy is a reminder to us to take the responsibility to fight for and uphold the values and freedoms which others have sacrificed their lives for. We should take inspiration from this to fight for ourselves, to fight for others, and to fight for a common goal - together - to make the world a better place for all.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#NurseDay #CanadaRemembers
... See MoreSee Less

Today for #InternationalNursesDay, we remember Nursing Sister Matilda Ethel Green who has a cross erected in her honor each November in the Field of Crosses.

Matilda Green was born August 14, 1886, in Litsowel, Ontario. She received her nursing training and graduated at Medicine Hat General Hospital in Alberta. In April, 1917, she enlisted with the Canadian Army Nursing Service from Calgary, AB. Immediately after, she was serving at the No. 7 Canadian General Hospital in Étaples, France. It is an understatement to say that the conditions Green would have faced were challenging. Supplies, food and water were often scarce, the amount of patients and wounded coming in were overwhelming, and nursing sisters often worked long shifts.

In the First World War, women did not fight as soldiers, but they greatly contributed to the war effort in many other ways. Nearly 2,500 other Canadian women served overseas as nursing sisters (just as Matilda Green did), and many more worked at home to care for the sick and wounded. Often referred to as Angels of Mercy by the many soldiers they treated, there is much to learn from the bravery displayed and sacrifices made by these women.

In October of 1918, Green fell ill with pneumonia, and succumbed to the illness, dying of it. She was one of 53 women to give their lives for Canada.

Matilda Greens sacrifice reminds us not to take our freedom for granted. Her life and legacy is a reminder to us to take the responsibility to fight for and uphold the values and freedoms which others have sacrificed their lives for. We should take inspiration from this to fight for ourselves, to fight for others, and to fight for a common goal - together - to make the world a better place for all.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#NurseDay #CanadaRemembers
3 days ago
Field of Crosses

This past Sunday, May 9, marked the 7th anniversary of Canada's National Day of Honour, which took place in 2014 to commemorate Canada’s Afghanistan mission.

More than 40,000 Canadians troops were involved between 2001 and 2014, the largest deployment since the Second World War. The Canadian forces played a role in attempting to bring democracy to Afghanistan and fight terrorism following the events of September 11, 2001. Canadians were involved in numerous combat operations throughout their time in the nation, which was concluded on June 6, 2011, after Prime Minister Stephen Harper declared the mission a success as the region was safer than it was when Canada’s Armed Forces arrived in 2006.

The Canadian efforts in the war were highly effective, but it came at a great cost. Suicide attacks and roadside bombs from the opposition were common, and caused the most Canadian casualties. Throughout the 13-year war, a total of 158 Canadians were killed.

11 of these heroes are commemorated annually in the Field of Crosses, their names are as follows:

𝗗𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗞𝗲𝘃𝗶𝗻
Y R 22 Pte PPCLI 03/08/2006

𝗚𝗼𝗱𝗱𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗡𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗮
K 26 Capt RCHA 17/05/2006

𝗛𝗼𝗿𝗻 𝗖𝗵𝗮𝗱𝘄𝗶𝗰𝗸
J 21 Pte PPCLI 03/09/2008

𝗛𝗼𝗿𝗻𝗯𝘂𝗿𝗴 𝗡𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻
24 Cpl KOCR 24/09/2007

𝗞𝗲𝗹𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗕𝗿𝘆𝗰𝗲
J 27 Cpl PPCLI 03/08/2006

𝗠𝗮𝗿𝘀𝗵𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗻
H 24 Spr 1 CER 30/10/2009

𝗠𝗶𝗼𝗸 𝗚𝗲𝗼𝗿𝗴𝗲
R 28 Sgt CER 30/12/2009

𝗥𝗼𝗯𝗲𝗿𝘁𝘀 𝗝𝗼𝘀𝗵𝘂𝗮
B 29 MCpl 2nd Bn PPCLI 09/08/2008

𝗦𝘁𝗮𝗿𝗸𝗲𝗿 𝗠𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗲𝗹
G 36 Cpl 15 (Edm) Fd Amb 06/05/2008

𝗦𝘁𝗶𝗿𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 (𝗧𝗝) 𝗧𝗵𝗼𝗺𝗮𝘀
29 Cpl RCR 18/08/2009

𝗦𝘁𝗼𝗰𝗸 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝗽𝗵𝗮𝗻
J 25 SP 1 CER 20/08/2008

www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FallenHeroes #CanadaRemember #CanadianArmedForces
... See MoreSee Less

This past Sunday, May 9, marked the 7th anniversary of Canadas National Day of Honour, which took place in 2014 to commemorate Canada’s Afghanistan mission. 

More than 40,000 Canadians troops were involved between 2001 and 2014, the largest deployment since the Second World War. The Canadian forces played a role in attempting to bring democracy to Afghanistan and fight terrorism following the events of September 11, 2001. Canadians were involved in numerous combat operations throughout their time in the nation, which was concluded on June 6, 2011, after Prime Minister Stephen Harper declared the mission a success as the region was safer than it was when Canada’s Armed Forces arrived in 2006. 

The Canadian efforts in the war were highly effective, but it came at a great cost. Suicide attacks and roadside bombs from the opposition were common, and caused the most Canadian casualties. Throughout the 13-year war, a total of 158 Canadians were killed. 

11 of these heroes are commemorated annually in the Field of Crosses, their names are as follows:

𝗗𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗞𝗲𝘃𝗶𝗻 
Y R 22 Pte PPCLI 03/08/2006

𝗚𝗼𝗱𝗱𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗡𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗮 
K 26 Capt RCHA 17/05/2006 

𝗛𝗼𝗿𝗻 𝗖𝗵𝗮𝗱𝘄𝗶𝗰𝗸 
J 21 Pte PPCLI 03/09/2008 

𝗛𝗼𝗿𝗻𝗯𝘂𝗿𝗴 𝗡𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 
24 Cpl KOCR 24/09/2007 

𝗞𝗲𝗹𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗕𝗿𝘆𝗰𝗲 
J 27 Cpl PPCLI 03/08/2006 

𝗠𝗮𝗿𝘀𝗵𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗻
 H 24 Spr 1 CER 30/10/2009 

𝗠𝗶𝗼𝗸 𝗚𝗲𝗼𝗿𝗴𝗲 
R 28 Sgt CER 30/12/2009 

𝗥𝗼𝗯𝗲𝗿𝘁𝘀 𝗝𝗼𝘀𝗵𝘂𝗮 
B 29 MCpl 2nd Bn PPCLI 09/08/2008 

𝗦𝘁𝗮𝗿𝗸𝗲𝗿 𝗠𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗲𝗹 
G 36 Cpl 15 (Edm) Fd Amb 06/05/2008 

𝗦𝘁𝗶𝗿𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 (𝗧𝗝) 𝗧𝗵𝗼𝗺𝗮𝘀 
29 Cpl RCR 18/08/2009 

𝗦𝘁𝗼𝗰𝗸 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝗽𝗵𝗮𝗻 
J 25 SP 1 CER 20/08/2008

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FallenHeroes #CanadaRemember #CanadianArmedForces
6 days ago
Field of Crosses

76 years ago today, V-E (Victory in Europe) Day was celebrated as the official end to fighting in Europe in the Second World War in 1945 after Germany’s unconditional surrender.

#Canada had been at war since September 1939. The country had waged war against a relentless enemy across land, sea and air from the North Atlantic to Hong Kong. More than 1,000,000 Canadians and served during the war and more 45,000 lost their lives.

Upon confirmation of the news at home in Canada, massive crowds filled the streets and celebrated with parades, concerts, and exuberance. Upon learning of the news, Prime Minister Mackenzie King wrote in his diary: “This has been a good day – a happy day… one in which the burden has been greatly lightened from the knowledge that Nazi militarism has, at last, been destroyed."

Today, we pause to pay our respects to the courage and sacrifice of those who fought tirelessly in Europe and supported the war effort at home. To all those that answered the call of duty to defend peace and freedom – we remain forever in your debt.
#CanadaRemembers #OnThisDay #VEDay

Canadian Armed Forces
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1 week ago
Field of Crosses

May is recognized in Canada as Asian Heritage Month.

Throughout our 154 year history, Asian immigrants have participated in numerous military conflicts across the world on behalf of Canada. More than 800 Chinese Canadians enlisted in the First and Second World Wars alone. Many Asian Canadians from Japan, China and India believed that fighting for freedom and national security would show their commitment to Canada with the hopes of reversing long experienced racism by the Canadian government. Many Asian Canadians were granted the right to vote following the Second World War, after showing their devotion to Canada by fighting overseas.

Approximately 200 Japanese Canadians overcame prejudice and enlisted, fighting for Canada in the fields of Europe during the First World War. These soldiers fought in major offensives including the Somme, Passchendaele, Hill 70, and Vimy Ridge. 25 percent of Japanese Canadians died in this war, and an additional 92 were wounded. 13 were awarded Military Medals for bravery.

18 of these casualties are commemorated annually in the Field of Crosses.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#CanadaRemembers #AsianHeritageMonth #CanadianArmedForces
... See MoreSee Less

May is recognized in Canada as Asian Heritage Month. 

Throughout our 154 year history, Asian immigrants have participated in numerous military conflicts across the world on behalf of Canada. More than 800 Chinese Canadians enlisted in the First and Second World Wars alone. Many Asian Canadians from Japan, China and India believed that fighting for freedom and national security would show their commitment to Canada with the hopes of reversing long experienced racism by the Canadian government. Many Asian Canadians were granted the right to vote following the Second World War, after showing their devotion to Canada by fighting overseas.  

Approximately 200 Japanese Canadians overcame prejudice and enlisted, fighting for Canada in the fields of Europe during the First World War. These soldiers fought in major offensives including the Somme, Passchendaele, Hill 70, and Vimy Ridge. 25 percent of Japanese Canadians died in this war, and an additional 92 were wounded. 13 were awarded Military Medals for bravery.

18 of these casualties are commemorated annually in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#CanadaRemembers #AsianHeritageMonth #CanadianArmedForces
1 week ago
Field of Crosses

May 4th is International Firefighters Day.

It is a time where the world’s community can recognize and honour the sacrifices that firefighters make to ensure their communities and environment are as safe as possible. It is also a day in which current and past firefighters can be thanked for their contributions.

The Field of Crosses would like to recognize and thank the Calgary Fire Department (CFD) members and past members for their service. In addition we would like to acknowledge and thank the CFD for their involvement and participation at the Field of Crosses in many capacities each year.

Each November we commemorate the following four CFD war dead with a distinguishing marker on their cross.

𝐏𝐭𝐞 𝐖𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐆. 𝐁𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐭 – Age 27

𝐏𝐭𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐫 𝐅. 𝐁𝐨𝐰𝐝𝐞𝐧 – Age 30

𝐋/𝐂𝐩𝐥 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐅. 𝐁𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐨𝐧 – Age 22

𝐂𝐩𝐥 𝐉𝐨𝐡𝐧 𝐆𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫 – Age 24

This past November Fire Chief Steve Dongworth personally lit and placed a candle at each of their crosses in a special ceremony held prior to the Night of Lights Sunset Ceremony at the Field of Crosses.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#CanadaRemembers #FirefightersDay #CanadianArmedForces
... See MoreSee Less

May 4th is International Firefighters Day.  

It is a time where the world’s community can recognize and honour the sacrifices that firefighters make to ensure their communities and environment are as safe as possible.  It is also a day in which current and past firefighters can be thanked for their contributions.   

The Field of Crosses would like to recognize and thank the Calgary Fire Department (CFD) members and past members for their service.  In addition we would like to acknowledge and thank the CFD for their involvement and participation at the Field of Crosses in many capacities each year.

Each November we commemorate the following four CFD war dead with a distinguishing marker on their cross.

𝐏𝐭𝐞 𝐖𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐆. 𝐁𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐭 – Age 27

𝐏𝐭𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐫 𝐅. 𝐁𝐨𝐰𝐝𝐞𝐧 – Age 30

𝐋/𝐂𝐩𝐥 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐅. 𝐁𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐨𝐧 – Age 22

𝐂𝐩𝐥 𝐉𝐨𝐡𝐧 𝐆𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫 – Age 24

This past November Fire Chief Steve Dongworth personally lit and placed a candle at each of their crosses in a special ceremony held prior to the Night of Lights Sunset Ceremony at the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#CanadaRemembers #FirefightersDay #CanadianArmedForces

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Thank you also Sheilah Daniels-Smith for your contribution and involvement in Field of Crosses

Sheilah Daniels-Smith

Calgary Firefighters Association

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Today for #InternationalNursesDay, we remember Nursing Sister Matilda Ethel Green who has a cross erected in her honor each November in the Field of Crosses.

Matilda Green was born August 14, 1886, in Litsowel, Ontario. She received her nursing training and graduated at Medicine Hat General Hospital in Alberta. In April, 1917, she enlisted with the Canadian Army Nursing Service from Calgary, AB. Immediately after, she was serving at the No. 7 Canadian General Hospital in Étaples, France. It is an understatement to say that the conditions Green would have faced were challenging. Supplies, food and water were often scarce, the amount of patients and wounded coming in were overwhelming, and nursing sisters often worked long shifts.

In the First World War, women did not fight as soldiers, but they greatly contributed to the war effort in many other ways. Nearly 2,500 other Canadian women served overseas as nursing sisters (just as Matilda Green did), and many more worked at home to care for the sick and wounded. Often referred to as "Angels of Mercy" by the many soldiers they treated, there is much to learn from the bravery displayed and sacrifices made by these women.

In October of 1918, Green fell ill with pneumonia, and succumbed to the illness, dying of it. She was one of 53 women to give their lives for Canada.

Matilda Green's sacrifice reminds us not to take our freedom for granted. Her life and legacy is a reminder to us to take the responsibility to fight for and uphold the values and freedoms which others have sacrificed their lives for. We should take inspiration from this to fight for ourselves, to fight for others, and to fight for a common goal - together - to make the world a better place for all.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#NurseDay #CanadaRemembers
...

21 2

This past Sunday, May 9, marked the 7th anniversary of Canada's National Day of Honour, which took place in 2014 to commemorate Canada’s Afghanistan mission.

More than 40,000 Canadians troops were involved between 2001 and 2014, the largest deployment since the Second World War. The Canadian forces played a role in attempting to bring democracy to Afghanistan and fight terrorism following the events of September 11, 2001. Canadians were involved in numerous combat operations throughout their time in the nation, which was concluded on June 6, 2011, after Prime Minister Stephen Harper declared the mission a success as the region was safer than it was when Canada’s Armed Forces arrived in 2006.

The Canadian efforts in the war were highly effective, but it came at a great cost. Suicide attacks and roadside bombs from the opposition were common, and caused the most Canadian casualties. Throughout the 13-year war, a total of 158 Canadians were killed.

11 of these heroes are commemorated annually in the Field of Crosses, their names are as follows:

𝗗𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗞𝗲𝘃𝗶𝗻
Y R 22 Pte PPCLI 03/08/2006

𝗚𝗼𝗱𝗱𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗡𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗮
K 26 Capt RCHA 17/05/2006

𝗛𝗼𝗿𝗻 𝗖𝗵𝗮𝗱𝘄𝗶𝗰𝗸
J 21 Pte PPCLI 03/09/2008

𝗛𝗼𝗿𝗻𝗯𝘂𝗿𝗴 𝗡𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻
24 Cpl KOCR 24/09/2007

𝗞𝗲𝗹𝗹𝗲𝗿 𝗕𝗿𝘆𝗰𝗲
J 27 Cpl PPCLI 03/08/2006

𝗠𝗮𝗿𝘀𝗵𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗻
H 24 Spr 1 CER 30/10/2009

𝗠𝗶𝗼𝗸 𝗚𝗲𝗼𝗿𝗴𝗲
R 28 Sgt CER 30/12/2009

𝗥𝗼𝗯𝗲𝗿𝘁𝘀 𝗝𝗼𝘀𝗵𝘂𝗮
B 29 MCpl 2nd Bn PPCLI 09/08/2008

𝗦𝘁𝗮𝗿𝗸𝗲𝗿 𝗠𝗶𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗲𝗹
G 36 Cpl 15 (Edm) Fd Amb 06/05/2008

𝗦𝘁𝗶𝗿𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 (𝗧𝗝) 𝗧𝗵𝗼𝗺𝗮𝘀
29 Cpl RCR 18/08/2009

𝗦𝘁𝗼𝗰𝗸 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝗽𝗵𝗮𝗻
J 25 SP 1 CER 20/08/2008

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FallenHeroes #CanadaRemember #CanadianArmedForces
...

33 1

May is recognized in Canada as Asian Heritage Month.

Throughout our 154 year history, Asian immigrants have participated in numerous military conflicts across the world on behalf of Canada. More than 800 Chinese Canadians enlisted in the First and Second World Wars alone. Many Asian Canadians from Japan, China and India believed that fighting for freedom and national security would show their commitment to Canada with the hopes of reversing long experienced racism by the Canadian government. Many Asian Canadians were granted the right to vote following the Second World War, after showing their devotion to Canada by fighting overseas.

Approximately 200 Japanese Canadians overcame prejudice and enlisted, fighting for Canada in the fields of Europe during the First World War. These soldiers fought in major offensives including the Somme, Passchendaele, Hill 70, and Vimy Ridge. 25 percent of Japanese Canadians died in this war, and an additional 92 were wounded. 13 were awarded Military Medals for bravery.

18 of these casualties are commemorated annually in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#CanadaRemembers #AsianHeritageMonth #CanadianArmedForces
...

13 4

May 4th is International Firefighters Day.

It is a time where the world’s community can recognize and honour the sacrifices that firefighters make to ensure their communities and environment are as safe as possible. It is also a day in which current and past firefighters can be thanked for their contributions.

The Field of Crosses would like to recognize and thank the Calgary Fire Department (CFD) members and past members for their service. In addition we would like to acknowledge and thank the CFD for their involvement and participation at the Field of Crosses in many capacities each year.

Each November we commemorate the following four CFD war dead with a distinguishing marker on their cross.

𝐏𝐭𝐞 𝐖𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐆. 𝐁𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐭 – Age 27

𝐏𝐭𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐫 𝐅. 𝐁𝐨𝐰𝐝𝐞𝐧 – Age 30

𝐋/𝐂𝐩𝐥 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐅. 𝐁𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐨𝐧 – Age 22

𝐂𝐩𝐥 𝐉𝐨𝐡𝐧 𝐆𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫 – Age 24

This past November Fire Chief Steve Dongworth personally lit and placed a candle at each of their crosses in a special ceremony held prior to the Night of Lights Sunset Ceremony at the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#CanadaRemembers #FirefightersDay #CanadianArmedForces
...

22 2

The Field of Crosses is pleased to announce (Capt. Ret’d) Sarah Wuntke has joined the Board of Directors. Sarah brings a wealth of Military experience and public service to her new role with the Board. She joins George Brookman, Murray McCann, Susan Schalin, Eppo Van Weelderen and Jordan Witzel in working on this unique and special Southern Alberta project.

Sarah Wuntke is the Executive Director of Social Venture Partners Calgary, a charitable organization that brings together non-profit organizations and high-skill volunteers to work together on capacity-building projects. After completing her undergraduate degree in Honours History at the Royal Military College of Canada, Sarah served in Canada’s Army as a Health Care Administration Officer for almost 10 years. Sarah recently finished her term as the Board Chair of the Calgary Military Family Resource Centre. She is a community builder, skilled communicator, and constant learner.

𝙒𝙚𝙡𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙎𝙖𝙧𝙖𝙝!
...

39 4

H.M.C.S. Athabaskan G07

Commissioned on February 3, 1943, the Tribal Class destroyer HMCS Athabaskan’s first mission began on March 29, 1943 to patrol the Iceland Faeroes Passage for blockade-runners. Afterwards, she carried out anti submarine patrols. On August 27, 1943 she was hit by a glider bomb off the Spanish coast but managed to reach Devonport, England where she remained under repair until November 10, 1943.Following repairs, she returned to Scapa Flow, Scotland in December 1943. In February 1944, she rejoined Plymouth Command and was assigned to supporting the operations of the 10th Minelaying Flotilla in the English Channel.

On April 26, 1944, she helped sink the German torpedo boat T29. Three days later, a torpedo from the German torpedo boat T24 sank her north of the Île de Bas while operating with her sister-ship HMCS Haida. Of the 261 sailors of the Ship’s Company, her captain and 127 men were lost, 85 were taken prisoner, 42 were rescued by HMCS Haida, and the remaining 6 managed to reach England in a small craft.

A monument was established in their memory at Plouescat Communal Cemetery in Finistere, France.

In 2002 the wreckage of the HMCS Athabaskan was located near the French island of Batz in the English Channel in 90 meters of water. Canada, devoted to protecting Royal Canadian Navy shipwrecks and their contents, petitioned France with respect to HMCS Athabaskan, the French government has placed the wreck under legal protection of the French Heritage Code.

Athabaskan Island, near Bell Bella, British Columbia was named in memory of HMCS Athabaskan.

There are 8 known Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve (RCNVR) sailors of the HMCS Athabaskan who are remembered each November in the Field of Crosses.

𝗙𝗹𝗲𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝗛𝗮𝗿𝗼𝗹𝗱 𝗟.
Age 28 – Able Seaman

𝗝𝗼𝗵𝗻𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗻𝗲, 𝗟𝗮𝘄𝗿𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝗥.
Age 19 – Able Seaman

𝗟𝗶𝗻𝗱, 𝗠𝗲𝗸𝗸𝗲𝗹 𝗚.
Age 28 – Petty Officer Stoker

𝗠𝗰𝗕𝗿𝗶𝗱𝗲, 𝗝𝗼𝗵𝗻 𝗟.
Age 19 – Able Seaman

𝗠𝗰𝗚𝗿𝗲𝗴𝗼𝗿, 𝗪𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗮𝗺
Age 32 – Leading Stoker

𝗣𝗶𝗸𝗲, 𝗕𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗼𝗻 𝗝.
Age 22 – Able Seaman

𝗥𝗼𝗹𝗹𝘀, 𝗥𝗮𝘆𝗺𝗼𝗻𝗱 𝗕.
Age 21 – Able Seaman

𝗦𝗮𝗺𝗽𝘀𝗼𝗻, 𝗙𝗿𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗶𝘀 𝗟.
Age 27 – Able Seaman
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As National Volunteer week comes to a close, we would like to share one final post to acknowledge a very special group of volunteers.

"𝘈𝘭𝘭 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘤𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘱𝘶𝘵 𝘪𝘯 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘣𝘺 𝘷𝘰𝘭𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘦𝘳𝘴."

The Ypres 3 CAV (Canadian Army Veterans) Motorcycle Club set up the rows of crosses you see here in the Field of Crosses each year.

As Major Kent Griffith explains in this video, they do so with meticulous care and attention to detail, and ensure every row and every cross is perfectly straight.

Thank you for your commitment Ypres 3rd CAV!
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The International Day of Monuments and Sites, also known as World Heritage Day, is an international observance held on April 18 every year all over the world with various activities, including visits to monuments. The Cenotaph at the Field of Crosses is a monument in Calgary which pays tribute year round to the men and women of Southern Alberta who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving in the military to protect the freedom we enjoy in this great country we call Canada. In addition, for the eleven days leading to Remembrance Day, 3,500 crosses stand as silent sentinels recognizing individually the 3,500 Southern Albertans who paid the ultimate sacrifice but also recognizes that, from all across Canada, 120,000 heroes gave up their lives for our freedom.

It is incumbent on all to honour our fallen. Each day that passes we move further away from the wars our country was involved in; the heroes pass, time pushes on and the future gets in the way of the past as we move through our own days and months and years. The Field of Crosses cenotaph and the ceremonies held at the cenotaph each of the eleven days are important reminders.

www.fieldofcrosses.com

#worldheritageday #fieldofcrosses #fallenheroes #remembrance #weremember #neverforget
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#NationalSiblingsDay serves to celebrate and recognize the importance of brothers and sisters.

Today, we would like to acknowledge the 57 sets of sibling combinations we commemorate each November in the Field of Crosses, including brothers Joseph and Thomas Dutton.

DUTTON, Joseph M.
Age 23 – FS (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 06/06/1942

DUTTON, Thomas A.
Age 20 – WO2 (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 03/03/1943

Joseph Mervyn Dutton, born on April 3, 1919, and brother of Thomas Alexander Dutton, born in Calgary, Alberta on June 3, 1922, were the sons of Mabel Dutton and Mervyn “Red” Dutton, who at the time was the acting President of the of the National Hockey League.

Joseph attended school in Calgary, Alberta at Cliff Bungalow and later Central High School. At the time of his enlistment, his occupation was listed as a hockey player with an Eastern US amateur team.

At Enlisting in Calgary on October 11, 1940 with the Royal Canadian Air Force, service number R60552, serving with the 419 (Moose) Squadron.

Joseph earned his Pilots Wings July 15, 1941.

Joseph was killed in action on June 6, 1942 at the age of 23 when his aircraft failed to return from air operations against Essen, Germany. This was his 30th mission, he received his Operational Wings posthumously on May 2, 1946.

Thomas was attending St. John’s College in Winnipeg, Manitoba when he decided to enlist in Regina, Saskatchewan on April 2, 1940, with the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Service number R61271, serving with the 427 (Lion) Squadron. Thomas achieved the rank of Warrant Officer Class II.

He was killed in action on March 3, 1943 at the age of 20 when his aircraft had been detailed on a mine laying operation over enemy water. Thomas and his crew did not return from the operation.

Warrant Officer Class II Thomas A. Dutton and Flight Sergeant Joseph M. Dutton have no known graves, however their names are inscribed on the Runnymede Memorial, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey, England. They are also commemorated on the Nanton War Memorial.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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Vimy Ridge Day is a day to commemorate the deaths and casualties of members of the Canadian Corps in the Battle of Vimy Ridge, which took place during the First World War. The holiday has been observed annually on 9 April since 2003.

On the morning of April 9th, 1917, after days of heavy artillery bombardments across Northern France, Canadian troops advanced on Vimy Ridge. In their first opportunity to fight together, all four Canadian divisions stormed the front. At 5:30 AM, 15,000 troops advanced under the protection of the creeping barrage, a newly adopted strategy that used artillery as a defensive cover.

Vimy Ridge was a strategically important position that saw approximately 150,000 deaths of French and British troops in the earlier stages of the war. To prevent a repeat of earlier efforts, the Canadian corps thoroughly planned and practiced their attack. The infantry were given specialist roles such as machine gunners, rifleman, and grenade throwers to allow for greater firepower and flexibility in the heat of battle. Models of the battlefield and aerial reconnaissance photographs were provided behind the lines for training purposes.

Along with superior preparation, the Canadian forces outnumbered the German defenders, 35,000 to 10,000. By April 12th, the Canadians captured the Pimple, a high point on the north end of the ridge, which was one of the most well defended parts of the German lines. Although the battle was successful, April 9th, 1917 became and still remains to this day, the bloodiest day in Canadian military history. In total, 3,598 were killed and an additional 7,000 wounded. In recognition of Canada’s success, 100 hectares of land was given to the Canadian government, including Hill 145 in France, which is now the home of the Vimy Memorial; the white marble monument was unveiled in 1936, and is an important reminder of the sacrifices Canadians made.

Each November the Field of Crosses in Calgary commemorates 209 Canadians from Southern Alberta who made the ultimate sacrifice at Vimy Ridge.

www.fieldofcrosses.com
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𝘞𝘢𝘳𝘮𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘢 𝘫𝘰𝘺𝘧𝘶𝘭 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘣𝘭𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘥 𝘌𝘢𝘴𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘵 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘊𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴. ...

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During the night of March 24-25, 1944 one of the most amazing and daring escapes in history took place at the Stalag Luft III German prison camp.

Organization X, as they were called, set out to dig three tunnels (named Tom, Dick, and Harry) simultaneously in hopes that one of them would lead the men to freedom.

What is now known as “the Great Escape” was led by Canadian tunnel diggers, Canadian document forgers, Canadian scroungers, and many others in a variety of roles, with some 76 prisoners eventually making a break-out on that cold March night.

One of these Canadians, Flight Lieutenant Henry Birkland, of Calgary, Alberta is commemorated each November in the Field of Crosses.

Flight Lieutenant Birkland, was honoured on September 7, 2002 with a lake being named after him and was one of six Canadian airmen shot after being recaptured during the escape from Stalag Luft III.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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Happy St. Patrick's Day! 🍀 ...

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𝐓𝐫𝐞𝐛𝐛𝐥𝐞, 𝐏𝐡𝐲𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐬 𝐌.
Age 19 – Pte CWAC
Date of Death: 21/12/44

Phyllis Margaret Trebble was born September 4, 1925 in Medicine Hat, Alberta. She was the daughter of Tom and Thurza Trebble of Winnifred, Alberta.

Phyllis enlisted November 3, 1943 in Calgary, Alberta joining the Canadian Women’s Army Corp, service number W130290. She died December 21, 1944 at the age of 19 and is buried in Medicine Hat Hillside Cemetery.

Sadly, no further information has been found.

Private Phyllis M. Trebble is remembered each November in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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𝐁𝐮𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐧, 𝐄𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐞 𝐁.
Age 20 – L/Cpl CWAC
Date of Death: 20/09/43

Emilie Buchanan was born on March 4, 1923 in Carmangay, Alberta. She was the daughter of Linda Nugent and the late Ernest Nugent. Emilie was married to Pte. James F Buchanan of Rainier, Alberta, serving in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp. (RCAMC) stationed in Calgary.

Emilie enlisted September 30, 1942 in the Canadian Women’s Army Corp (CWAC), service number W13584 and reached the rank of Lance Corporal. While stationed at Canadian Forces Base Suffield, Alberta she was killed in a car accident on September 20, 1943 at the age of 20.

Lance Corporal Emilie Buchanan is buried at the Carmangay Cemetery and is commemorated each November in the Field of Crosses.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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Today, March 8, is International Women's Day. A day to celebrate the contributions of women and girls everywhere and to recognize women who inspire us all.

This week, we would like to take the opportunity to share with you a few stories of some of the brave Southern Alberta women who have served our country.

𝐁𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐧𝐥𝐞𝐞, 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌.
Age 23 – LAW RCAF
Date of Death: 10/10/43

Edith Mary Brownlee was born September 23, 1920 in Rycroft, Alberta. She was the daughter of George Howard and Mary Renton Brownlee (nee Aitchison). The family moved to homestead in Bridgeview, Alberta in 1929.

Edith enlisted October 31, 1942 in the Royal Canadian Air Force (Women’s Division), service number W309326 and obtained the rank of Leading Aircraftwoman. Sadly, she was killed by a hit and run driver in Brantford, Ontario on October 10, 1943 at the age of 23. The driver was convicted and sent to jail.

Edith is buried at Spirit River Municipal Cemetery, Alberta and is honoured in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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𝗞𝗻𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁𝘀, 𝗙𝗿𝗲𝗱𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗸 𝗔.
Age 21 – Sergeant 10th Bn
Date of Death: 27/02/1915

Frederick Anthony Knights was born in Hermon Hill, Wanstead, Essex England on July 2, 1893. As a boy he emigrated with his family to Canada. Frederick was the son of Richard and Annie Mary Knights of Massingham Ranch known for sheep breeding in Millerville, Alberta.

Frederick’s occupation was listed as a photographer and he had previously served 3 years with the 103rd Calgary Rifles. At the outbreak of WWI, Frederick enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) on September 24, 1914 and served with the 10th Battalion. Service number 20727.

Frederick was killed in action on February 27, 1915 at the age of 21 and is buried in Berks Cemetery Extension in Belgium.

Frederick’s older brother, Charles Richard Knights enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force on April 14, 1916 as a member of the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. He was killed in action October 26, 1917.

Both Frederick and his brother Charles are commemorated in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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𝗔𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻, 𝗝𝗼𝗵𝗻
Age 24 – ST RCNVR
Date of Death: 10/02/1942

John Anderson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Anderson of Eckville, Alberta.

John worked in Calgary employed by Picardy’s. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve (RCNVR), service number V13860, as a Steward on HMCS Spikenard.

John was killed on the 10th of February, 1942 at the age of 24. Steward John Anderson is commemorated on the Halifax Memorial in Nova Scotia, Canada.

HMCS Spikenard was torpedoed and sunk by German U-boat (U-136) south of Ireland while on convoy escort. There were only eight survivors.

John Anderson is commemorated in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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Little more than 20 years after the end of the “War to End all Wars,” the Second World War (1939–1945) erupted and soon spread across Europe and around the globe. The Second World War saw considerable growth in how Black Canadians served in the military. While some Black recruits would encounter resistance when trying to enlist in the army, in contrast to the First World War no segregated battalions were created. Indeed, several thousand Black men and women served during the bloodiest war the world has ever seen. Black Canadians joined regular units and served alongside their white fellow soldiers here at home, in England, and on the battlefields of Europe. Together they shared the same harsh experiences of war while fighting in places like Italy, France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

In the early years of the war, however, the Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Canadian Air Force were not as inclusive in their policies. This did not mean that trail-blazing Black Canadians did not find a way to persevere and serve. Some Black sailors served in the Navy, and Black airmen served in the Air Force as ground crew and aircrew here at home and overseas in Europe.

The contributions of Black servicemen was second to none and several earned decorations for their bravery. Some Black women joined the military as well, serving in support roles so that more men were available for the front lines.

And back on the home front, Black Canadians again made important contributions by working in factories that produced vehicles, weapons, ammunition and other materials for the war effort, and taking part in other patriotic efforts like war bond drives. For example, Black women in Nova Scotia worked in vital jobs in the shipbuilding industry, filling the shoes of the men who would usually do that work but who were away fighting in the war.

Many Black Veterans returned home after the war with a heightened awareness of the value of freedom and their right to be treated as equals after all they had done for Canada in their country’s time of need. The service of Black Canadians in the Second World War remains a point of pride.
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Every February, people in Canada are invited to participate in Black History Month to celebrate the legacy and contributions of Black Canadians and their communities. This is a time for all of us to learn and remember.

𝐖𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐬, 𝐒𝐚𝐦𝐮𝐞𝐥 𝐃.
35 – Pte 50th Bn
Date of Death: 22/08/17

Samuel Daniel Watts was born May 25, 1882 in Texas, USA. Samuel immigrated from Oklahoma to Canada and at the age of 34 enlisted in Olds, Alberta – joining the Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) and was assigned to the 50 th Battalion. He was also a member of the 187 Battalion Brass Band.

Samuel was only one of a few African-Canadians to have served during the First World War – yet despite the hardships they faced, he bravely served his country like all of the others who went off to war.

Samuel was killed on August 22, 1917, leaving behind his wife Margaret and three children. He was well known for being a cook, a western song writer and a brilliant inventor with several patents pending in Ottawa at the time.

Samuel Daniel Watts is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

He is commemorated in the Field of Crosses each November.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/
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