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2 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

𝐏𝐎𝐔𝐂𝐄𝐓𝐓𝐄 𝐉𝐨𝐞
Age 20 – Rfn RWR
Date of Death: 15/08/1944

Joe Poucette was born April 28, 1924, on the Stoney Nakoda Reserve in Morley, Alberta, he was the son of Peter and Jannie Poucette and brother to Noah. During his childhood, Joe fostered many interests and exhibited a fondness for sports including baseball, hockey, racing and football. He was also a keen outdoorsman with sharp hunting skills, he worked as a farmer and a trapper.

Joe enlisted on October 15, 1943, in Calgary, Alberta at the age of 19. He requested a position with an infantry unit and was assigned to the Royal Winnipeg Rifles. Joe enlisted in secret and made sure his paperwork was complete before he told his family. Prior to Joe leaving to join his unit, the community held a pow-pow to honour him and they gave him a traditional name and a ceremonial song.

In his last letter home he wrote, “ … I thought I missed the Calgary Stampede, but afterward I knew that I am doing the right job…I would like to hear if any of the boys won anything at the Stampede. I am sure they all got a mouthful of dirt anyway.”

Joe was killed in action on 15 August 1944 in Normandy, France, during the Victory of Falaise. Rifleman Joe Poucette is buried at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian Cemetery in Calvados, France.

Each November during the 11 days of Remembrance the Field of Crosses in Calgary, Alberta commemorates Private Joe Poucette.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FieldofCrosses #WeRemember #NeverForget #CanadianArmedForces #History #Alberta #Canada #Calgary
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𝐏𝐎𝐔𝐂𝐄𝐓𝐓𝐄 𝐉𝐨𝐞
Age 20 – Rfn RWR
Date of Death: 15/08/1944

Joe Poucette was born April 28, 1924, on the Stoney Nakoda Reserve in Morley, Alberta, he was the son of Peter and Jannie Poucette and brother to Noah.  During his childhood, Joe fostered many interests and exhibited a fondness for sports including baseball, hockey, racing and football. He was also a keen outdoorsman with sharp hunting skills, he worked as a farmer and a trapper. 

Joe enlisted on October 15, 1943, in Calgary, Alberta at the age of 19. He requested a position with an infantry unit and was assigned to the Royal Winnipeg Rifles. Joe enlisted in secret and made sure his paperwork was complete before he told his family. Prior to Joe leaving to join his unit, the community held a pow-pow to honour him and they gave him a traditional name and a ceremonial song.   

In his last letter home he wrote, “ … I thought I missed the Calgary Stampede, but afterward I knew that I am doing the right job…I would like to hear if any of the boys won anything at the Stampede.  I am sure they all got a mouthful of dirt anyway.”

Joe was killed in action on 15 August 1944 in Normandy, France, during the Victory of Falaise. Rifleman Joe Poucette is buried at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian Cemetery in Calvados, France.

Each November during the 11 days of Remembrance the Field of Crosses in Calgary, Alberta commemorates Private Joe Poucette.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FieldofCrosses #WeRemember #NeverForget  #CanadianArmedForces #History #Alberta #Canada #Calgary
3 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

As we celebrate the 4th of July with our neighbours south of the border, we reflect on the remarkable story of Americans who, before their nation joined the First World War, crossed into Canada to support the Allied forces. These brave men, driven by a sense of duty and camaraderie, joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and became part of the 97th Battalion, known as the American Legion, formed in Toronto in 1915.

Their dedication didn’t go unnoticed, and similar units were established across Canada, reflecting the shared values and bonds between the two nations. Each year, the Field of Crosses stands as a solemn reminder of their sacrifice, commemorating the 37 soldiers who fought under the Canadian flag.

On this Independence Day, we remember and honour their legacy, celebrating the spirit of unity and the enduring commitment to freedom and justice that transcends borders.

#4thofJuly #USA #America #Canada #FourthofJuly #FieldofCrosses #History #WW1 #WeRemember #NeverForget #Remembrance
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As we celebrate the 4th of July with our neighbours south of the border, we reflect on the remarkable story of Americans who, before their nation joined the First World War, crossed into Canada to support the Allied forces. These brave men, driven by a sense of duty and camaraderie, joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and became part of the 97th Battalion, known as the American Legion, formed in Toronto in 1915.

Their dedication didn’t go unnoticed, and similar units were established across Canada, reflecting the shared values and bonds between the two nations. Each year, the Field of Crosses stands as a solemn reminder of their sacrifice, commemorating the 37 soldiers who fought under the Canadian flag.

On this Independence Day, we remember and honour their legacy, celebrating the spirit of unity and the enduring commitment to freedom and justice that transcends borders.

#4thofJuly #USA #America #Canada #FourthofJuly #FieldofCrosses #History #WW1 #WeRemember #NeverForget #Remembrance
3 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

Happy Canada Day from The Field of Crosses! 🍁 ... See MoreSee Less

Happy Canada Day from The Field of Crosses! 🍁

Comment on Facebook

Happy Canada Day!

4 weeks ago
Field of Crosses

𝐂𝐎𝐀𝐃𝐘 𝐅𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐬 𝐀.
Age: 19 – F/S (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 25/06/1944

Francis Anthony Coady was born on November 2, 1924, in Wetaskiwin, Alberta, the son of James M.P. Coady and Minnie Coady of Leduc, Alberta. Francis enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and was assigned to 624 (SD) Special Duties Squadron of the Royal Air Force (RAF) as an Air Gunner.

The aircrew and ground staff were involved in supporting the liberation of France, Italy, and Yugoslavia from their air base in Blida, Algeria, North Africa. Nightly sorties were flown as low as 200–300 feet over the Mediterranean Sea and the mountainous terrain of southern Europe. Due to their extremely secret nature, they did not have an official badge, and their uniforms and planes had no identification markings or numbers.

Documented records of the 624 (SD) Special Duties Squadron RAF were very limited due to the secrecy of the work involved. The only person on each flight who knew the exact location of the drop zone was the navigator. Most orders and instructions were single-copy and handwritten. Duties included dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines and even transporting VIPs. Their work was so secret that even their families did not know where they were or what they were doing.

Flight Sergeant Francis A. Coady was killed in action on June 25, 1944, at the age of 19. He is buried in the Mazargues War Cemetery at Bouches-du-Rhone, France.

Each November, the Field of Crosses in Calgary, Alberta, commemorates Flight Sergeant Francis A. Coady.

www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FieldofCrosses #WeRemember #NeverForget #CanadianArmedForces #History #Alberta #Canada #RoyalAirForce #RCAF
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𝐂𝐎𝐀𝐃𝐘 𝐅𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐬 𝐀.
Age: 19 – F/S (AG) RCAF
Date of Death: 25/06/1944

Francis Anthony Coady was born on November 2, 1924, in Wetaskiwin, Alberta, the son of James M.P. Coady and Minnie Coady of Leduc, Alberta. Francis enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and was assigned to 624 (SD) Special Duties Squadron of the Royal Air Force (RAF) as an Air Gunner.

The aircrew and ground staff were involved in supporting the liberation of France, Italy, and Yugoslavia from their air base in Blida, Algeria, North Africa. Nightly sorties were flown as low as 200–300 feet over the Mediterranean Sea and the mountainous terrain of southern Europe. Due to their extremely secret nature, they did not have an official badge, and their uniforms and planes had no identification markings or numbers.

Documented records of the 624 (SD) Special Duties Squadron RAF were very limited due to the secrecy of the work involved. The only person on each flight who knew the exact location of the drop zone was the navigator. Most orders and instructions were single-copy and handwritten. Duties included dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines and even transporting VIPs. Their work was so secret that even their families did not know where they were or what they were doing.

Flight Sergeant Francis A. Coady was killed in action on June 25, 1944, at the age of 19. He is buried in the Mazargues War Cemetery at Bouches-du-Rhone, France.

Each November, the Field of Crosses in Calgary, Alberta, commemorates Flight Sergeant Francis A. Coady.

https://www.fieldofcrosses.com/

#FieldofCrosses #WeRemember #NeverForget  #CanadianArmedForces #History #Alberta #Canada #RoyalAirForce #RCAF

Comment on Facebook

I wouldn’t have known one thing about this”kid” losing his life or what on kind of mission … if …FIELD of Field of Crosses didn’t post these stories. I’m so honoured to at least know he was alive and served. I owe him at least that much.

1 month ago
Field of Crosses

Happy Indigenous Peoples Day from The Field of Crosses!

On this special day, June 21, we celebrate the vibrant cultures and significant impact of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples across our city, province and nation. Let's unite to embrace truth, foster understanding, and promote healiHappy Indigenous PeopeHappy Indigenous PoHappy InsHappy IaHappy IndigentHappy IHappy MHappy Inb#Communityunity
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Happy Indigenous Peoples Day from The Field of Crosses! 

On this special day, June 21, we celebrate the vibrant cultures and significant impact of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples across our city, province and nation. Lets unite to embrace truth, foster understanding, and promote healing.

#IndigenousPeoplesDay #TheFieldofCrosses #History #Canada #FirstNations #Inuit #Metis #Alberta #Community
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